Sine Wave Alignments of Sacred Sites


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A perfect circle bisecting the Earth describes the alignment of sacred energetic sites: a hoop of light. To the southeast of the Sphinx, directly east of the smallest pyramid is the massive limestone wall that defines an angular alignment not observed elsewhere in the Giza complex. The Wall of the Crow is a 600’ long by 30’ high megalithic wall undercut by a portal with a lintel that is among the largest fitted stones on the Giza plateau.

The interlocking masonry of this entrance to the plateau is highly reminiscent of the stonework found in the Andes, especially the megalithic site of Saqsaywaman, in modern day Peru at the ancient Inca capital of Cuzco. Giza’s gigantic Wall of the Crow does not share the pyramidal alignment to the geographic poles, but is angled 5° north of due east. The wall defines a division of two hemispheres along a circumference line around the Earth ’as the crow flies’, passing through Giza’s antipode in the Pacific Ocean at 30°S 149°W. Along that straight line path lay the Angkor temples of Cambodia to the east and the Nazca lines of Peru to the west, an alignment described as the Sine Wave of ancient sites by Jim Alison. The Wall of the Crow begins and ends at nodal points of the Magnetic Resonance structure, revealing the intimate relationship between the invisible resonance patterns and the layout of the limestone pyramid complex at Giza. As well, its name is another psychoacoustic reference to flight and the sine wave pattern produced by the flapping of a bird’s wings, just as observed at several of the sites along its defined planetary circumference, like the Nazca hummingbird.

This Sine Wave circumference is one half of a quadrupolar alignment that is offset to the same degree as the Earth’s magnetic North pole from the geographic N pole, the axis of Earth’s rotation. A line perpendicular to the Wall of the Crow, passing through the center of the Great Pyramid at an angle of 5° west of due north, describes the pyramids’ alignment to the magnetic N pole, which fluctuates position near 78.3°N 104.0°W in the Canadian arctic. The distance from the magnetic N pole to Giza in miles is identical to that of Giza to Angkor, both about 4,754 miles from Giza (F#359) along a pair of perpendicular circumferences quartering the Earth. These two intersecting circles of aligned sites define the axis of the quadrupolar standing waves described here as Magnetic Resonance. If a great circle is drawn around Giza passing through all of the points at this 19.1% distance from Giza, Angkor is exactly 25% of its circumference away from the magnetic North pole. This isosceles triangle of sites delineates the two prime meridians passing through Giza, at prime resonant distances. This analysis focuses on the straight-line phi relationships along these quadrupolar axes to reveal the nonlinear acoustic standing wave structures underlying the framework of Alison’s Sine Wave model.
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